Bootham School

North Yorkshire

Image for Bootham School

  • Category: Senior / Sixth Form
  • Pupils: Co-Education
  • Type: Day & Boarding
  • Religious Affiliation: Quaker
  • Roll: 365 (Boys) 251 (Girls)
  • Age Range: 3 - 18 years
  • Founded: 1823

Facilities

The beautiful ‘Arts and Crafts’ period library has been fully modernised. As well as over 10,000 books, a suite of computers and laptops, an extensive collection of multi-media resource material, periodicals and a newspaper cuttings service, the library has a virtual network available via the school’s intranet. The school has fast 24-hour broadband which every PC in the school is connected to. We run the very latest software and email is available to all pupils. The two dedicated ICT suites both have colour laser printers, projector and smart board.

The school enjoys a reputation for excellence in science. Now, 7 laboratories, with the latest ICT equipment, provide specialist science teaching in each discipline. The award-winning Hall offers a fine venue for Drama with a good-sized stage, orchestra pit and technical set-up. In addition, a fully equipped drama studio provides an excellent teaching facility. Art and Design facilities include 3 studios for ceramics and printing activities and two excellent DT workshops. The Music School and Theatre provide wonderful opportunities for developing musical talent. Around two-thirds of Bootham pupils study an individual instrument, a level of participation rarely achieved outside specialist music schools. The school orchestra, choirs, bands, ensembles and individual performers give regular concerts. The weekly programme of public performances in the beautiful Georgian Recital Room draws a regular capacity audience.

The sports hall, indoor swimming pool, squash courts, tennis courts, games pitches and orienteering course are all on site with more games pitches a short fifteen minute walk away at the Clifton estate. Individual sports such as fencing, judo, table tennis and riding (off site) are actively pursued along with the main team games.

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The school observatory has two telescopes and a revolving roof and has recently undergone major refurbishment. The Bootham Archives provide an excellent research facility. They not only contain the school's historical records but also provide a fascinating insight into the lives of Quaker influences and influential Quaker reformers such as Joseph Rowntree

There are 4 boarding houses, in elegant Georgian buildings and these along with a full range of school buildings tastefully blend to link the old and the new. A team of four qualified nursing staff, who also act as counsellors, provide round the clock care for all our pupils. All boarders may be registered with our visiting Doctor.

Open Days

2017. Senior School. Sat. 23rd September and Sat. 11th November, both 10.30am.

Fees

2016/2017. Day Fees. Years 9-13: £5840 per term. Years 7-8: £5295 per term. Years 1-6: £2665 - £3390 per term. Nursery(f/t) and Reception £2265 per term.

Boarding Fees. Years 9-13: £9665 per term. Years 7 and 8 (for all boarding options): £5990 per term. Weekly Boarding (Years 9-13): up to 6 nights: £8810 per term. Flexi-Boarding (Years 9-13): 2 nights: £6555 per term. 3 nights: £7665 per term. International Boarding (Years 9-13): £10,170 per term. The International Boarding Fee applies to non EEA nationals living abroad.

Reports

ISI Inspection 2014

School Contact Details

Headteacher: Mr Chris Jeffery

Bootham School
Bootham
York
North Yorkshire
YO30 7BU

[t]: 01904 623261
[w]: www.boothamschool.com

Location Description

Set in a spacious nine-acre estate, just 300 metres from York Minster, the main school campus consists of Georgian town houses - including two of the three boarding houses - along with a full range of school buildings all tastefully blended to link the old and the new. Outside there are lawns and gardens, a sports field and a beautiful cricket ground, all surrounded by mature trees. Just off the main campus is Evelyn House, for Sixth Form boys. A short fifteen minute walk takes you to the Clifton Estate. Here there are a further fifteen acres of grounds, sports fields and our Junior School.

To send an email to the school please fill in your details below and add a short message. If you are requesting a prospectus to be sent to you please include your postal address.

School News

Bootham School independent day and boarding school North Yorkshire

Students at Bootham School in York are celebrating an impressive collection of GCSE results, with performance up on all major measures. Sitting the tried and

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tested Maths, English Language and English Literature International GCSEs, Bootham youngsters did not have to worry about the new grading system in those subjects. Instead, with a 94% A*-CPass rate, 57% of passes between A*-A and 85% at A*-B, more than 1 in 5 students achieved 10 or more A/A* grades, with over a quarter gaining 9 or more.

4 candidates -Rob Davidson, Christopher Chivers, Luke Conkleton and Finn Van der Voort- rung up at least 11 A* grades each, pride of place going to Finn, whose 13 A* grades made him the school’s best performing youngster. 

Headmaster Chris Jeffery commented: “These results represent the culmination of two years’ hard work from pupils and staff, as well as fruits of strong and solid foundations set before GCSE courses started. I am very proud of the young people and colleagues who have worked with such commitment and determination to deserve them. 

“It’s been a really good summer for Bootham!”

Bootham School independent boarding school North Yorkshire

Students at Bootham School are celebrating successfully navigating the challenging first year of the change to tougher linear A Levels with excellent results. Over

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72% of scores achieved between A* and B grade, and nearly a quarter of students securing at least three A grades. These figures are in line with previous years’ results, despite the increased difficulty of the subjects that have made the transition.

Headmaster Chris Jeffery said:  “We are very proud of the achievements of our young people, who have coped so well with the challenge and chaos inherent in the ridiculously phased introduction of Michael Gove’s new A Level system.  We are equally delighted that 84% of those applying to university this year have secured a place on one of their chosen university courses. “

“The statistics, however, can never tell the whole story of the dedication that so many of them have shown in working hard for success, and of the considerable obstacles that some have overcome to secure their grades. They also only hint at the inspiration and support that their teachers have offered. “

“As ever, we are proud of their academic achievements, but even more proud of the impressive, thoughtful and caring young people that they have become. That will always be the most important aim of Bootham’s Quaker education” said Mr Jeffery.

Bootham independent day and boarding school York

The Bootham School students managed to secure the former florists on Bootham as a temporary art gallery for their work.

Titled ‘Order/Disorder’, the exhibition showcased pieces

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of work by the talented Year 12 students.

Bootham School’s Artist in Residence, Emily Binks, said, “The students have been working all term to plan and organise a public exhibition of their work; they have done everything from the conception of the idea to finding and securing a space to host the exhibition and of course produce the art work itself.”

The exhibition was timed to coincide with the school’s Parents’ Day which saw families celebrate the hard work of students and staff.

Bootham independent day and boarding school North Yorkshire

Bootham recently played host to A Midsummer Night’s Dream performed by our talented students and produced by our very own Drama department. The shows were

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thoroughly enjoyed by all who attended and the Drama department would like to extend their thanks to all who attended and supported their work. Here is just a selection of comments from those who attended:

“Atmospheric, hilarious, brilliantly performed!”

“Dazzling performances from all involved”

“The interludes were beautifully sung”

“Just like a professional show!”

“A Bottom we won’t forget!”

“It was hilarious and brilliant!”

We’ll leave you with these final kind words – “I have seen a professional performance of this and I did not smile once. This performance, I could not stop laughing. Superb acting making one of Shakespeare’s comedies truly comedic. You did him proud. A big thanks to all players, crew and staff”.

Bootham School independent day and boarding school North Yorkshire

Paralympian, Claire Harvey, gave the keynote speech at Bootham School on Thursday, 17 November 2016.

As part of our week celebrating diversity and inclusion, and marking anti-bullying

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week, students and staff at Bootham School were delighted to welcome Claire Harvey as our keynote speaker.

Claire joined KPMG in 2014 following a successful career in both public and private sectors.  She has worked within the criminal justice system, most notably as a Prison Governor, and was one of very few female Riot Commanders as well as the Prison Service Diversity Champion.  In 2010, she joined the FSA as diversity lead and went on to become Head of Corporate Responsibility in 2011.

Claire is also a Paralympian, having competed as captain of the London 2012 women’s sitting volleyball team.  She has since switched to Athletics and was selected for Rio 2016, but had to withdraw due to injury.  She is currently ranked fourth in the world in seated discus and fifth in shot put.

Claire talked about how inclusion can be a power for good, creating successful businesses and communities where differences are welcomed, respected and celebrated, and looking at ways we can bring about a more inclusive world.

Photo: Claire Harvey, Senior Inclusive Leadership Consultant, KPMG, and Paralympian

 

Bootham independent day and boarding school North Yorkshire

Bootham School’s new Headmaster, Chris Jeffery, was the first to congratulate student, Georgia Haynes, following her success in the Leeds Open Fencing Competition on Saturday,

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5th November.  She won the medal for ‘Best Placed Cadet’ and came 9th overall after losing by a very close margin to a Veteran GB fencer. 

Georgia has also been listed as a reserve for the Cadet GB squad for a competition in Copenhagen on 10th December, having already competed as part of the GB Cadet team in Germany last year when she was only fourteen. 

Chris Jeffery, said; “This is a fantastic achievement and recognition of Georgia’s ability at national and international level.  Georgia puts time and effort into everything she does, whether academic work, music or sport, and this success is well deserved. 

Of course Bootham values academic excellence, but we also promote the development of strong individual character, of resilience, of a wider outlook on the world, of those things that bring the deepest happiness in life, not just at school.   All this is what Bootham School is all about: getting the very best – intellectually, personally, spiritually – from the young people it is privileged to care for, and setting them on a road of lifelong fulfilment.

 We were very excited to hear about Georgia’s recent success.  Well done, Georgia, and good luck in your future competitions.”

Photo:  Georgia Haynes, Bootham School

Bootham independent day and boarding school North Yorkshire

James Haynes and Harvey Lyon who are both sixth formers from Bootham School have been awarded a national Arkwright Engineering Scholarship.  These Scholarships support 16

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to 18 year old students during the final two years of their school studies.  The Scholarships are awarded to only the highest-potential students across the country who show promise to be future leaders in the Engineering Profession.

James and Harvey were selected from over 1400 applicants following a rigorous selection process comprising of a two-hour engineering aptitude exam and interviews at Edinburgh University for James and Brunel for Harvey.  Arkwright Engineering Scholarships are awarded annually and recipients have gone on to become CEOs of their own companies, industry Directors and leading academics.

Scholars are provided with exciting and exclusive opportunities to learn more about engineering, such as mentoring and company visits.

Harvey will be sponsored by Plowman Brothers Ltd.  This company is based in Yorkshire and provides engineering solutions to many industries. They work on diverse projects, from 3D printing and small bespoke fabrication through to large-scale industrial contracts.

James will be sponsored by the The Royal Aeronautical Society.

Bootham School students marked International Peace Day on 21st September with a silent witness demonstration along the School frontage facing the main road of Bootham.

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Students from both the Senior School and from Year 6 at Bootham Junior School took turns to stand behind the giant 30 foot banner as a mark of solidarity with those involved in various peace initiatives throughout the world.

Meanwhile, throughout the day there were various peace related themes running through the teaching timetable with ‘PEACE ONE DAY’ as the focus. The day culminated with a pinwheel decorated Peace Tree in the grounds of the School.

Newly arrived Headmaster, Chris Jeffery, said, “The theme of peace has rarely been more topical, given current world events, but for us at Bootham, peace is also about the way we live our lives and the positive approach we encourage in the resolution of conflict.

Disagreements are a natural part of the human condition; it’s how we go about resolving our differences which marks out the Quaker approach we try to model here. Strongly held views are encouraged, but the lesson for our students is to hear and respect the opinions of others, and in so doing to learn the skills of negotiation which leads to the peaceful resolution of conflict.”

Bootham independent day and boarding school North Yorkshire

It’s a great welcome for new Head as Bootham School’s Sixth Form hits record numbers

As new Headmaster, Chris Jeffery, takes up the reins of Bootham

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School a new record has been reached in the School’s history. This September the School has recorded its highest ever number of Sixth Form students, a total of 178, 28 of whom are new this term. Chris Jeffery said, “It’s really encouraging to step straight into the record books on my very first day as head, but of course this milestone in the School’s history is down to the growing reputation which the School is enjoying throughout the country and well beyond. At Bootham the broad education we offer is founded on a strongly held set of positive values which stem from our Quaker ethos. As my predecessor, Jonathan Taylor, said, in the summer, when commenting on the School’s A level results, a student’s individual exam success is only a part of what they take with them from their school days at Bootham.

Chris Jeffery has taken up post following 12 years as Head of the highly regarded Grange School in Cheshire. He is not new to York, however, having studied History at York University.

Bootham independent boarding school Yorkshire

Sixth Form student, Guylaine Eckersley, from Bootham School has just received the exciting news that she will be performing at the Albert Hall in this

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year’s last night of the proms.  Guylaine won a place in the BBC Proms Youth Ensemble on bassoon after submitting a video in a competition for 14 to 21 year olds.  The Youth Ensemble will join forces with the world renowned BBC Symphony Orchestra on the last night of the proms in the Royal Albert Hall, to play a piece that was commissioned for the event.

Bootham School’s Director of Music, Paul Feehan, said, “This is an absolutely fantastic achievement and a tremendous opportunity for Guylaine to play with her “dream orchestra”. Well done Guylaine and good luck!”

Guylaine is a regular performer in the popular; Thursday Lunchtime Recital Room Events which take place at 1pm every Thursday during the school term.  Entry is free and access is directly off the street via 45 Bootham.  For more information visit www.boothamschool.com

Bootham independent school Yorkshire

12th June marks 100 years since the death of renowned physics Silvanus P. Thompson, who was born in York in 1851. Silvanus attended Bootham School

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between 1858 and 1867, and returned as a teacher between 1870 and 1875.  During his career he was appointed Professor of Physics at University College Bristol and was made Fellow of the Royal Society, President of the Institution of Electrical Engineers, President of the Physical Society of London and President of the Röntgen Society.  A blue plaque, recognising his particular contribution to science, is one view on the wall of 51 Bootham.

Silvanus P. Thompson benefitted from the revolutionary science teaching at Bootham.  In an age where schools of its type focused mainly on games and the classics, Bootham was an early pioneer of science teaching, and founded the very first school science society in 1837.  The school was particularly well equipped with laboratories and had its own observatory, and regular lectures were given by visiting scientists on everything from Anatomy, Mechanics, Fossil Zoology, Physics and even the construction of the Menai Bridge.  During a speech at the school 1902, Silvanus Thompson talked about the “many memories some of us have of the mysterious operations, the photography, and the chemical explosions which went on.”  He approved of how students were taught “not to be afraid to try, to put forward their strength, to make experiments.  This character, this sturdy independence, this originality of effort, which the school has fostered, may we not hope that it will long flourish?”  He argued that the pressure of examinations should not be allowed “to spoil in the future those features of originality, those sources of independent life, and those influences which have developed the School along its own lines?  Are we to have a school of which the primary consideration is that it shall score in taking off prizes at outside examinations?  I sincerely hope that will not be so.”

He was also a strong advocate of the role of women in science and went out of his way in welcoming women scientists into public domain.  In a speech in 1899, in support of the first address by a woman to the Society of Electrical Engineers, he said; “I want to widen the opportunities for women, and above all, to make them realise and share in the pleasure I feel, that the number of women who devote themselves to science may be an ever increasing one.”

Headmaster, Jonathan Taylor said; “We like to think that this thread of encouraging curiosity, of looking for the best in each individual and enabling each person to make the best use of their own talents has continued throughout the history of the school.”

 

Photo: Silvanus P. Thompson (in hat) greets Bootham Headmaster Arthur Rowntree

Bootham independent school yorkshire

BuroHappold, the Engineering Consultancy, set Bootham School Design and Technology students the brief of designing a scientific research facility to be based in the Antarctic.

The brief

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stated:

The facility would be home to a class of British high school students for one year.  The students would assist scientists with carrying out research into climate change.  The station would have to be designed to specifically address the design challenges facing a building in an extreme and inhospitable environment.

The young designers who took up the challenge had to take into consideration a number of design criteria including, architectural layout, construction, sustainability and future-proofing.  They then had to present their ideas to three engineers from BuroHappold

Bootham’s head of Design Technology, Eamonn Molloy, said, “The engineers were impressed with the quality of the student’s ideas, their detailed research, and their

ability to justify and explain the thinking behind their design decisions.  It was a great project to be part of.”

 

Photo: L to R Frankie Bartlett, Alex Johnson seated, Toby Houldridge, Christopher Chivers and Jack Leonard-Morgan along with engineers from BuroHappold

British Science Week is being marked in a big way at Bootham Junior School with every child involved in some way. The week includes

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visits from top scientists, including Professor Lucy Carpenter, whose work on the Earth’s oceans and atmosphere has earned her awards from the Royal Society. The children will also hear from Dr James Chong and his search for new bacterial species aimed at saving the soil and aiding food production.

Teacher, Valerie Davies, explained the significance of the week; “Meeting and learning from ‘real life’ scientists from different backgrounds gives the children a deeper understanding of the role scientists play in many diverse aspects of our lives, so they develop as socially-aware, questioning and active citizens of our modern scientific world.” Head teacher, Helen Todd, agreed, saying; “Science helps develop teamwork and citizenship, and a variety of problem solving and questioning skills that children will apply to other parts of their lives.”

The company ‘Science Boffins’ will also provide a day of exciting assemblies and workshops as part of the week.

Two talented musicians from Bootham School have scooped first place in the prestigious Mrs Sunderland Music Competition.  The competition, which takes place in Huddersfield over

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a two week period, commands a very high standard of performance with adjudicators from top conservatoires.  Bootham’s Tom Sanderson, a Year 10 student, won the ‘Graham Wade Trophy’ for his performance in the Year 11 and under Classical Guitar Solo, for the second year running.  Year 8 student, Emily Watson, won the ‘B.B White Memorial Trophy’ for her performance on the flute in the Year 9 and under Woodwind Solo, again for the second year running.

Other performers included Yilin Xu who, at only Year 8, played in the Open String Solo class which requires the minimum of grade 8 standard, was awarded second place for her performance on violin.  Also Henry Chen, a Year 10 student, was pipped into second place for Classical Guitar where he was awarded a distinction.

Commenting on the results, Paul Feehan, Bootham’s Director of Music, said, “It’s been a fantastic set of results – really well done to all!”

With a script that is full of good humour, the cast and support team of Bootham School’s Drama and Art departments have come together to

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put on a stunning performance of Alan Bennett’s adaptation of Wind in the Willows.  With nineteen cast members and a matching number of backstage crew.  The show promises a great evening’s entertainment.

The star roles are played by:  Marianna Cox (Toad), Bella Glover (Ratty), Freyer Collins (Mole), Rob Davidson (Badger).

Director, Simon Benson, said, “I hope you enjoy the production. I have loved working with these actors and with such a talented bunch of people behind the scenes – they have all made directing and producing this play a real pleasure.”

He went on to give more background – “Alan Bennett adapted The Wind in the Willows in 1990 for the National Theatre – where it was staged as their Christmas show later that year.  Bennett

had been exploring for some time the possibility of creating a stage play that combined The Wind in the Willows with an account of Kenneth Grahame’s life.  The idea never came to fruition.  However, Bennett couldn’t resist going on to write his The Wind in the Willows in the light of what he knew of Graham’s life, and flavouring it with a large dose of his own inimitable good humour.

Kenneth Grahame was born in 1859, lacking what he described as ‘a proper equipment of parents’.  Effectively orphaned at the age of five, he spent the rest of his childhood at boarding school.  His hopes to go on to university were dashed when the ‘grown ups’ (as he always called his family) decided he should work in the City – where he duly went to work as a clerk in the Bank of England.  He did well there and rose to the position of Secretary.  Then, in 1899 (after forty years of bachelordom) he married – ‘rather resignedly’, according to Bennett.

It is, perhaps, no coincidence then that all the heroes in the book (Rat, Mole, Badger and Toad) are confirmed bachelors who take every opportunity to celebrate and enjoy their unmarried status (occasionally expressing some dodgy attitudes towards women along the way).  One of the great pleasures of working with these actors has been seeing how they have responded to these bachelors – three of whom are, of course, being played by girls.  Bennett has helped us hugely here by writing a script that is full of good humour and makes no attempt to take the characters too seriously.  But the actors have helped too – as they have grasped hold of their characters and thoroughly enjoyed their foibles and idiosyncrasies.

While at the Bank of England, Grahame wrote numerous articles and stories – some for publication, some to amuse and entertain his son, Alastair.  The stories written for Alastair became, in 1908, The Wind in the Willows. Given that Alastair was, by all accounts, a spoilt child given to tantrums; it is quite likely that the character of Toad was intended to ring a bell with Alastair.  But it is difficult not to respond with warmth and affection for Toad, even when he is at his most egotistical, pompous and absurd.  Certainly, Bennett has celebrated Toad as a larger than life figure, but Toad is also as aware as we are of his inconsistencies and total lack of humility – and, though he may be ignorant in some respects, he is not unfeeling and is capable of generosity.

In the book, Grahame writes wistfully about the Riverbank, evoking a world of charm and ease. The Wild Wood challenges but does not threaten that, and the two environments have learnt to coexist in a sort of uneasy alliance.  The World of human beings is a different kettle of fish altogether.  When Rat declares, “I do not want to see the World.  From what I’ve seen of it so far it has very little to recommend it.  Everybody doing things, getting somewhere”, he expresses a sentiment close to Grahame’s heart – that modern suburban life, the spread of the railways and an ever expanding middle class pose a direct threat to the countryside and to nature.  The World is largely absent in the play, the longest scene set in the World takes place in a prison cell – then on a train that helps Toad escape and return to the Riverbank.  The symbolism here, coupled with what the actors bring from the World into their performances, perhaps makes us realise what Graham was getting at.

 

Photo:  Front – Rob Davidson (Badger), Marianna Cox (Toad), Freddie Jones (Albert).    Rear – Freya Collins (Mole)

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