Eastbourne College

East Sussex

Image for Eastbourne College

  • Category: Senior / Sixth Form
  • Pupils: Co-Education
  • Type: Day & Boarding
  • Religious Affiliation: Church of England
  • Roll: 353 (Boys) 274 (Girls)
  • Age Range: 13 - 18 years
  • Founded: 1867

General Information

We believe the key values of participation, the pursuit of excellence, integrity, courtesy and kindness form the bedrock upon which every child’s education should stand, providing young people with the wherewithal to flourish both at school and beyond.

Facilities

Set in a stunning location between the sea and the South Downs, Eastbourne College offers a superb education for its pupils. Every boy and girl is encouraged and supported to achieve their full potential, wherever their strengths lie.

The importance of family life cannot be under-estimated and the College has responded to this by introducing a new boarding model that accommodates greater weekend flexibility. The new ‘flexi’ weekends enable pupils to choose whether they remain at school or return home for part of the weekend. These are in addition to traditional exeat weekends.

The first phase of the Project 150, a £33 million development taking place at the College, opened its doors to delighted pupils and staff in January 2017. The new Nugee Building has delivered 32 state-of-the–art classrooms, two specialist IT suites and several stunning entertaining areas. A new cricket pavilion was also opened last spring and there is great excitement about the new sports centre and dining hall due for delivery in April 2018.

There are excellent Music and Drama facilities including the Birley centre, a stunning performing arts centre that houses an acoustically-designed auditorium with sprung floor, a fully-equipped recording studio, percussion rooms, a vocal booth, music technology suites and a gallery and exhibition area. In addition, the College has a fully equipped 284-seater theatre with a raked auditorium and a 120 seat studio theatre. The school has an excellent learning resources centre and also its own Chapel. Pupils are able to join the choir which sings regularly, not only at chapel services but also annually at Chichester and Winchester cathedrals as well as various orchestras, bands and ensembles. The Science Department occupies an award winning £4m state-of-the-art building and the College is justly proud of its outstanding Design and Technology facilities.

Sport is an important element of the school curriculum with very good results. A-D sports teams in every year group, boys and girls. Running alongside the College's major sports programme, other sports include athletics, golf, horse riding, tennis and sailing. An extensive co-curricular programme also exists with CCF, ‘Service at School’, D of E and many other opportunities.

Entrance Requirements

Scholarship, Common Entrance or own exam, plus visit at 13+; reports and visit at 16+

Scholarships

Entry to Year 9: Art, Academic, Drama , Music and Sports. Entry to Year 12: Academic (inc. Science), Music, Sport, Drama, Art and Design and Technology. Please contact the College for details. Means tested bursaries also available

Open Days

2018. Open Mornings: Sat. 16th June and Sat. 15th September, both 9am – 1pm

Fees

2017/2018. Boarding: Years 9 – 11 £33,930 per annum, Sixth Form £34,320 per annum. Day: Years 9 – 11 £22,260 per annum, Sixth Form £22,620 per annum.

Reports

ISI Boarding Inspection 2012
ISI Inspection 2014
Link to Eastbourne College videos

School Contact Details

Headteacher: Mr T Lawson

Contact for enquiries: Ms Eloise Cheary, Director of Admissions

Eastbourne College
Old Wish Road
Eastbourne
East Sussex
BN21 4JX

[t]: 01323 452323
[f]: 01323 452307
[w]: www.eastbourne-college.co.uk

Location Description

The College is situated on the edge of Eastbourne’s town centre, minutes from the sea and the glorious South Downs and a five minute walk to the station, with its main-line trains to London Victoria.

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School News

Eastbourne College independent day and boarding school East Sussex

To mark International Women’s Day, there has been a series of initiatives in the College today where pupils and staff have all taken

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part.

Lessons have been especially focused on notable women this week. Women are in the forefront in Mr Wood’s Philosophy lessons. As part of International Women’s Day, pupils have been learning more about Simone de Beauvoir, Hypatia of Alexandria, Mary Wollstonecraft, and other prominent women in Philosophy. Pupils have also been discussing gender parity and looking at ways in which they can, as individuals, pledge to make their environment more equitable for people of all genders. They made personal pledges of how they intend to ‘press for progress’ in order to achieve this end and to help make their school inclusive for all, mirroring the College’s key values of participation, the pursuit of excellence, courtesy, integrity and kindness.

The Art department has launched a series of projects to learn more about  the woman behind our Chapel’s stained glass windows. Mary Lowndes was a leading light in the suffrage movement (Chair of the Artists’ Suffrage League 1907-18) where she designed many of the banners used in public demonstrations and marches. She was also a business woman, the co-founder of Lowndes and Drury who were commissioned to create eight of our stained glass windows in chapel, five of which are signed by Lowndes. Pupils will be involved through activities, trips and workshops over the next two terms to learn more about this fascinating woman.

Female pupils and staff have gathered together on College Field in glorious sunshine this morning to perform a short yoga sun salutation sequence as a show of strength and solidarity for International Women’s Day.

The Arnold girls also got behind the initiative by encouraging people to wear purple on their hands to show support of women and by decorating the dining hall with purple balloons full of motivational words and stats about notable women in History.

The Headmaster addressed a letter to parents this morning challenging the notion that single-sex schools are good for girls (and boys). Read the Headmaster’s letter here.

Eastbourne College Independent East Sussex Eastbourne College Housemistress Takes Fastest Women’s Time in The Marathon of Afghanistan

An account of the marathon and trip by Victoria Burford, an Eastbourne College girls’ boarding Housemistress.

‘Another marathon in Afghanistan? You’re going back?  You must be

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mad’ was the usual reaction from my friends and colleagues when I mentioned my plans to return to Afghanistan in November 2017. Having raced the previous year and surprised myself by winning the female title, I couldn’t wait to return, although to travel to Afghanistan is never without risks. Indeed, as I landed in a misty Kabul from Gatwick and heard of a fatal attack that same day on a Shia mosque, it was with both nerves and excitement that I passed through the many checkpoints at immigration. However, as dawn set on a troubled Kabul and we watched groups of innocent children playing with kites on a hilly outcrop, I knew that my decision to return was right, whatever the outcome of the race.

I have enjoyed running since a young adult, and since becoming a boarding Housemistress although the time pressures of training to run a marathon while concomitantly running a boarding house can sometimes be challenge (anyone fancy a 20 miler between roll call and chapel?), I find that long distance running can be a great way of alleviating the demands of the job and creating vital headspace. Many of my best House initiatives have been borne on the South Downs, although woe betide the girl (or parent) who comes between me and my post run refuel!

The Marathon of Afghanistan and the associated 10k is the only sporting event in Afghanistan where girls and boys can take part together, and is organised with a charity called Free to Run which is an inspirational organisation which works with women and girls in conflict areas to give them confidence, equality and education through exercise. The entry fees paid by the international runners enable both the local Afghans to take part for free, and for a small group of girls from Free to Run to  participate and  take part in a training schedule in the months leading up to the marathon. We spent a day hiking with some of these girls, and it was humbling to hear some of their stories – before Free to Run, these girls would risk stoning, insults and death threats if they ran on the streets, and they would be reduced to training in small compounds or stairwells.  Over tea in a local shepherd’s hut, we all discussed why we enjoyed  running.  For the international runners, the reasons were predominantly health driven, yet the unilateral reason cited by these local girls was to bring about change in their country.  While hiking up the hill, one of girls who was a student at the American University in Kabul told me that ‘things had been tough recently’, due to a Taliban bomb at the university which had killed a lot of her friends and teachers.  The mental and physical resilience of all of these girls is truly remarkable.

The marathon took place in the town of Bamiyan which is a Hazara stronghold in the North of Afghanistan at an altitude of 2,500m.  With a Buddhist past, its cliffs are dotted with ancient sacrificial caves, some of which now house refugees.   One of these caves is also a school, and it was wonderful to return there and teach a lesson. All that remains of the largest Buddha statues which the Taliban blew up in 2001 are huge silhouettes etched into the black rock face.  It was an out and back route – climbing 700 metres directly up and down a hill on a well tarmacked road – never have I felt so happy in the 14th mile of a marathon! Because of the altitude and the 8 am start, it was never oppressively hot – a bonus since we had to ensure that our clothing fully covered us, including headwear.  The morning of the races afforded a rea sense of camaraderie with 300 competitors lined up to race.  It was one of the fastest starts ever with adrenalin and inexperience playing no small part. After about a kilometre the dirt track became a fully tarmacked road, and I managed to settle into a pace. I passed through the 5k checkpoint without stopping, and paused at 10k checkpoint where an inviting tray of bananas, apricots and home-made cake  awaited. It really was a long and winding road up the hill – it was beautiful in its bleakness,  remote,  flanked by two mountains so the air still bitingly chilly  – running through shepherd settlements where fields of potatoes were being harvested by families, being overtaken by the occasional donkey laden with fodder – it was like running in a bygone era. We passed through dramatic gorges and small villages, where locals would stare at us with mild bemusement. One man even invited me in for a cup of tea – I don’t think that he quite understood the concept that we were running a marathon. Sadly the racing culture in Afghanistan is almost non-existent, so there was a fair amount of cheating, ranging from people jumping into cars to hitching an illicit ride on a bike or even a donkey.  In a land of widespread poverty, chip timing would seem like an ironic luxury, but I really do think that it was ignorance rather than malice behind a lot of the cheating.  Indeed  as I was huffing my way up the hill, I chuckled when a fellow competitor asked me quite innocently how I intended to get down the hill – the concept of actually running the 26 miles of a marathon seemingly quite novel to him.  As I ran down the hill, it became apparent to me that I was the first female, but knowing how difficult the last few miles of a marathon can be (all the more so at altitude), I could afford to take nothing for granted, but it was not until I crossed the finish line and had the position to me confirmed that I could really relax! The winning man, a taxi driver from Kabul, by then adorned in an Afghan flag and being interviewed by local TV was being feted  as a local hero (and rightly so) and it was an honour to be part of his story and indeed part of the journey behind running in Afghanistan – a journey which may only be in its first few faltering miles, but one which thanks to Free to Run and the Marathon of Afghanistan, can increasingly be enjoyed by both girls and boys.

Back now in UK where I am free to wear what I want, do what I want, run where I want, Afghanistan feels miles away. Without a doubt, Afghanistan is a country which challenges the senses – so often associated with danger, war, bombings and violence, but it is also a country of love, compassion, friendship and  some of the warmest hospitality I have ever encountered. Like running itself, it is a country where a whole range of emotions inextricably connected and the fine line between joy and pain, wealth and poverty, laughing and crying can change at the blink of an eyelid.  Like running, Afghanistan is a country which gets under your skin and challenges a return.  And you may even find yourself a champion!

Victoria completed the marathon in an impressive 4 hours and 25 minutes.

Eastbourne College Independent East Sussex Willingdon Community School and Eastbourne College working together

Willingdon Community School and Eastbourne College are working together in a collaborative homework club. Every Monday a group of Year 11 pupils from Willingdon Community

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School meet with Year 12 and 13 College pupils to go over GCSE subjects.

Willingdon Community School and Eastbourne College working together…  “We thought it would be like Hogwarts!”

Collaborative Peer Mentoring.

Every Monday afternoon a group of Year 11 pupils from Willingdon Community School meet up with a group of Year 12 and Year 13 pupils from Eastbourne College to go over subjects they are working on for their forthcoming GCSE exams. The pupils are paired up so that each Eastbourne College pupil has a good knowledge of the subject area where his or her pupil may need some guidance. Emily Beer, the Headteacher at Willingdon, and Tom Lawson, the Headmaster of Eastbourne College, both see this as a wonderful opportunity for all those taking part.

Tom Lawson says: ‘It is often the case that you never really know a subject until you teach it. I have no doubt that our pupils are getting just as much out of these sessions as the group from Willingdon.’

The group has become known as Roy’s Homework Club after the Headmaster’s dog, who always looks forward to the arrival of the Willingdon pupils.  Miss Beer says: “I am delighted to be part of this pilot project for the Eastbourne Schools Partnership. Peer to peer support has definite merit in helping students progress and reach their potential.  I am very grateful to the students of Eastbourne College who have committed to working with Willingdon students to not only support their learning journey but to raise their aspirations. This opportunity also allows misconceptions about state and private education to be overcome. Students realise that they are like minded individuals who often have a tremendous amount in common.”

Grace:

“It really helps me, the mentors can get learning across to me in a different way to my teachers and I am really enjoying it.”

Mervin:

“The mentoring programme at Eastbourne College has helped me, as it has allowed me to work with students closer to my age. They have been able to relate to me and empathise with me.”

Hannah Tingley-Martin:

“My new mentor has helped me to understand things I struggle with in class, boosting my confidence.”

Freya Smith:

“I really like going to Eastbourne College, I find it really helpful getting help from other students and revision tips.”

Adam Howard, Eastbourne College pupil:

“Knowing that we are helping is richly rewarding and also gives us an opportunity to learn different techniques to certain subjects together and apply them to our own work.”

Eastbourne College independent day and boarding school East Sussex

As part of Eastbourne College’s 150th anniversary celebrations Professor Lord Winston visited and gave a workshop to sixth formers and then a lecture to the

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whole school on Tuesday 28 November.

As part of Eastbourne College’s 150th anniversary celebrations Professor Lord Winston visited and gave a lecture to the whole school on Tuesday 28 November. Professor Winston initially spent an hour in the science centre, observing young scientists conducting experiments, talking to them about their work and career aspirations, and even showing the pupils how to slice the thinnest of samples for observation under a microscope.

Below are some of the pupils’ observations about his visit:

“I really enjoyed meeting Professor Winston. I was thrilled when he took the time to look down the microscope and ask me questions on the practical I was doing, and showed genuine interest when he asked me about my future career plans. The lab session was wonderful, giving me insights into Professor Winston’s work into fertility and his thoughts on how he chose his field. He is an inspiration”. Abigail Thompson (Lower Sixth).

“The school talk was really amazing, sharing his experience with us was incredibly interesting. Using his own personal examples, he talked about the ethical debate of medicine and life, which was full of wisdom and hope. I hope that he would consider coming back not only to give talks, but to inspire young budding scientists and doctors”. Goh Shieh Yeow (Lower Sixth).

“I thought his visit to the lab was very beneficial and intellectually stimulating because he took the time to explain current complex research in stem cell development and also showed an interest in the heart dissection I was carrying out by asking some thought provoking questions”. Gui Raphael (Upper Sixth).

After the lab lesson, the whole College and other members of the wider College community, gathered for the lecture and question and answer session, in which Professor Winston shared some of his experiences, wisdom, and predictions for the future, along with his passion for science, particularly his first love, supporting the very first stages of life. The evening was a wonderful event, and one which none of our extended College family will forget.

Eastbourne College independent day and boarding school East Sussex

Pupils and staff at Eastbourne College are celebrating another year of superb GCSE results.

Over 99% of this year’s 128 Year 11 pupils achieved

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five or more A*-C grades, with 31% of all grades at A*. Seventy-two of the year group notched up five or more A* or A grades. Strength in science is clearly shown by the percentages of A*/A in those subjects: Biology 95%, Chemistry 93%, Physics 91%. Outcomes are excellent across the curriculum, with 83% A*/A in Art and forty pupils achieving the top grade (A*) in English Literature.

Eleven pupils achieved at least 8A*s, with leading performers Ben Kremer gaining 10A*, 1A and one grade 9 and Tatyana Goodwin gaining 11A* and one grade 7. Other superb performances were achieved by Cordelia Stevenson (10A*, 1A, 8) and Sian Sulke (10A*, 1A, 8), Katie Meikle (9A*, 2A, 8), Freya Gordon (9A*, 1A, 6) Lianna Yuen (8A*, 3A, 6), Julian Schutzner (8A*, 3A, 4), Harry Jachuck (8A*, 2A, 6), Aimee Helyar (8A*, 1A, 8) and Isabel Igbokwe (8A*, 1A, 1B, 7).

Twenty Year 10 pupils who sat their maths IGCSE a year early achieved an A* grade.

Headmaster Tom Lawson commented, ‘These excellent GCSE results are a credit to the hard work of the pupils and their teachers who have given them the individualised support to achieve their aspirations. Statistics cannot do justice to the way that pupils have exceeded expectations across the ability range and many proud parents will know that their child has a set of grades that do them credit.

The high number of pupils with a string of A*/As testifies to the stretch we can offer the most academic pupils and they will continue to be challenged with our bespoke programme throughout the sixth form.’

Eastbourne College independent day and boarding school East Sussex

Once again, Eastbourne College girls and boys are celebrating a set of excellent A level results.

Outstanding individual performances came from Tom Alston with

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four A* grades; Katya Goodwin with three A* and one A grade; Isabella Ripley with three A*; and Alex Garcia Whittam, Hugo McNally, Jane Mullaney, Millie Ngai Lenoir, Charles Pendry, Martha Piper and Grace Porter each achieved two A* grades and one A grade.

James Edwards, Andrei Ellis, Ben Hughes, Andrew Lasita, Mario Pulze, Aidan Tam, and Katherine Williams all attained one A* and two A grades and a further 37 pupils gained three A levels with at least two A* or A grades. 100% of candidates applying to Oxford or Cambridge universities secured their places.

The Eastbourne College headline figures are superb with almost 40% of the grades awarded at A* or A. Strong performances were delivered across the academic departments.

Commenting on these achievements, Headmaster Tom Lawson said: ‘We are delighted that Eastbourne College pupils consistently achieve results of which they and their families can be very proud. The College serves to bring the very best out of each individual, ensuring that every young woman or young man successfully responds to our realistic, high expectations of them.

This is the first cohort of pupils under the new examination system and we are extremely pleased with how this year’s sixth form pupils have risen to the challenge of their A levels. We congratulate those who have done so very well. These results are a tribute to the hard work of the pupils and teaching staff of Eastbourne College. We celebrate their outstanding individual and collective success both in and beyond the classroom.’

Eastbourne College independent day and boarding school East Sussex

On Friday 10 March the Eastbourne College swimming team took part in the biggest competition of the swimming calendar, the Bath Cup. This was held

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at the Queen Elizabeth Olympic pool in London.

With over 90 teams entered for the initial heats, the standard required and pressure on all the competitors to make finals was intense. As usual the Eastbourne team performed with great aplomb, surpassing expectations by reaching the finals in all classes, breaking numerous personal best times and school records along the way. Qualifying for the finals in such a competitive competition is a huge achievement and further strengthened the College’s excellent reputation in the Bath Cup.

Results – Boys:

4x50m medley relay final  – 6th place

4x100m freestyle relay final – 8th place

Results – Girls:

4x50m freestyle relay final  – 7th place

4x50m medley relay final – 9th place

 

The following pupils broke College records:

Tom Alston – breaststroke with a time of 33.03 sec

Liberty Balmer – front crawl with a time of 28.36 sec

Bethany Tagg  – butterfly with a time of 31.68 sec

 

The girls 50m front crawl record was broken 3 times on the day!

 

All competitors achieved personal best times. Details as follows:

Tom Alston – front crawl and breastroke

Liberty Balmer – front crawl (x2)

Roisin Dixon- backstroke and front crawl

Izzy MacIntosh – breaststroke

Euan McGreevy – front crawl and butterfly

 

Will McNeilly – front crawl (x2)

Bethany Tagg – front crawl and butterfly

Louis Wood – backstroke and front crawl

Eastbourne College independent day and boarding school East Sussex

Pupils and staff at Eastbourne College are celebrating superb GCSE results again this year.

Over 98% of this year’s 121 Year 11 pupils achieved five or

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more A*-C grades, with 27% of all grades at A*. Seventy-four of the year group notched up five or more A* or A grades. Strength in science is clearly shown by the percentages of A*/A in those subjects: Biology 87%, Chemistry 93%, Physics 83%. Humanities thrive alongside STEM subjects, with 84% A*/A in Art and forty-four pupils achieving the top grade (A*) in English Literature.

Eleven pupils achieved at least 8A*s, with top pupil Hugo Najbor gaining 12A* and one B. Euan McGreevy gained 11A* and 1A, followed by Dasha Konovalova (10A*, 2A) and Rosie Kremer (10A*, 1A)  Close behind were Nuriya Powell (9A*, 2A), Madeleine Taylor (9A*, 1B), Elias Brown (8A*, 4A), Indy Wood (8A*, 3A), Martin Chow (8A*, 2A, 1C), Max Al-Hasso (8A*, 1A, 2B) and Claudia Grace (8A*, 1A, 2B).

Eighteen of the nineteen Year 10 pupils who sat their maths IGCSE a year early achieved an A* grade.

Newly-appointed Headmaster Tom Lawson commented:

‘These excellent GCSE results are a credit to the hard work of the pupils and their teachers who have given them the individualised support to achieve their aspirations. Statistics cannot do justice to the way that pupils have exceeded expectations across the ability range and many proud parents will know that their child has a set of grades that do them credit.

The high number of pupils with a string of A*/As testifies to the stretch we can offer the most academic pupils and they will continue to be challenged with the opportunity of specialised support in scholarship groups and the extended project qualification.

Anyone who employs young people knows that exam grades are one thing; the ability to work hard, make teams work, show integrity, courtesy and kindness to all are another thing altogether. As well as doing all we can to ensure that our girls and boys perform well in public exams, we work hard to develop young people who will live fulfilled and successful adult lives. We achieve this by means of a full co-curricular programme and a strong pastoral system that places an emphasis on values and developing character.’

 

Other statistics:

Pass rate                                                                                             100%

Percentage of students with at least five A*–C grades                            98%

Percentage of students with at least five A grades or higher                  62%

Eastbourne College independent day and boarding school East Sussex

Once again Eastbourne College girls and boys are celebrating another superb set of A level and AS level results with 77% of all grades at

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A*, A or B.

Outstanding individual performances came from Toby Brooks with five A* grades; Sophie Noton with four A* and one A grade; Tianyu Wang with three A* and one A grade; and Mia Finnamore, Megan Good and Robert Meikle each achieved three A* grades.  Vanessa Erl and Ivan Loginov secured an excellent two A* and two A grades. Nick Atkins, Katie Butler-Manuel, Lucy Hyde and Jack Turner all attained two A* and one A grade.  A further twelve pupils achieved at least one A* and two A grades and there were many, many other notable performances.

Commenting on these achievements, newly-appointed Headmaster Tom Lawson said:

‘We are delighted that these headline figures confirm, once again, how Eastbourne College pupils achieve results of which they and their families can be very proud.  The College serves to bring the very best out of each individual, ensuring that every young woman or young man successfully responds to our realistic, high expectations of them.’

At AS level, the Lower Sixth also performed well, with 60 % of grades awarded A or B, positioning them well for a highly successful final year at the College.

The Headmaster said: ‘We are absolutely delighted with how this year’s sixth formers have risen to the challenge of their AS and A level examinations and really pleased for all those who have done so very well. These results are a real tribute to the hard work of the pupils and teaching staff of Eastbourne College. We celebrate their outstanding individual and collective success both in and beyond the classroom.’

 

Pupils and staff at Eastbourne College are celebrating superb GCSE results again this year.
Every one of this year’s 120 Year 11 pupils achieved five or

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more A*-C grades, with 25% of all grades at A*. Sixty-seven of the year group notched up five or more A* or A grades.
Twelve pupils achieved at least 8A*s, with top pupil Katya Goodwin gaining 11 A* and one A. Millie Ngai Lenoir and Isabella Ripley each gained a clean sweep of 11 A*s. Close behind were Ben Hughes (10A*, 2A), James Martin (10A*, 1A, 1B), Charles Hendry (9A*, 2A) and Martha Piper (9A*, 2A). 100% of the Year 10 pupils who sat their maths GCSE a year early achieved an A* grade.
Headmaster Simon Davies reflected:
‘We are delighted with what the girls and boys who took GCSEs in June have achieved by working hard and making the most of the first class teaching and support available to them at the College. Of course it is uplifting to see those who have long lists of A*s after their names, but it is every bit as exciting to see others who have, for instance, 6As and 4Bs and know that this is a triumph for them given their underlying academic ability – the very definition of real and impressive value added!
Headline figures are all very well, but what really counts is how each and every young person has done versus their own potential. Through a combination of their own efforts, high expectations, and plenty of support and challenge from those who teach and mentor them, very many of this year’s GCSE candidates have done themselves proud: all the way across the ability range young people have exceeded high realistic expectations and together produced results in line with or better than more selective schools.
As well as doing all we can to ensure that our girls and boys perform well in public exams, we work hard to develop young people who will live fulfilled and successful adult lives. We achieve this by means of a very full co-curricular programme and a strong pastoral system that places an emphasis on developing young people’s values. Anyone who employs young people knows that exam grades are one thing; the ability to work hard, make teams work, show integrity, courtesy and kindness to all are another thing altogether.’
Other statistics:
Pass rate 100%
Percentage of students with at least five A*–C grades 100%
Percentage of students with at least five A grades or higher 56%

Eastbourne College girls and boys are celebrating another superb set of A level and AS level results. 78% of all grades were A*, A or

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B and almost half of the grades awarded were A* or A grades.
Commenting on this achievement, Headmaster Simon Davies said: We are delighted that headline figures confirm, once again, how Eastbourne College pupils, year after year, achieve results of which they and their families can be very proud. The College serves to bring the very best out of each individual; ensuring that every young woman or young man performs to their best versus our realistic, high expectations of them. What also matters is that we all remember that education is about so much more than exam grades and all the while public exams were in session, right to the end of the summer term, there were full programmes of creative arts, meaningful charitable activity and highlevel sport including extremely successful cricket, tennis and athletics seasons.
In the summer A-level examinations superb individual performances smashed national averages including, among others: Kajal Radia with four A* grades; Laurence Cox, Claudia Mercer and Shan Zhang with three A* and one A grade and Florence Hole and Jessica Porter both achieving three straight A* grades. Pia Unutzer achieved an impressive two A* and two A grades. Equally impressive were Bella Bearcroft, Lotte Carter, Ben Foster, Sami Ghani, Harry Piper, Joe Scott and Rafe Sulke, all of whom secured two A* and one A grade. There
were many, many other notable performances.
At AS level, the Lower Sixth also performed extremely well, perfectly positioning them for a highly successful final year at the College.
The Headmaster said: ‘We are absolutely delighted with how this year’s sixth formers have risen to the challenge of their AS and A level examinations and really pleased for all those who have done so very well. These results are a real tribute to the hard work of the pupils and teaching staff of Eastbourne College. We celebrate their outstanding individual and collective success both in and beyond the classroom.’

Once again Eastbourne College girls and boys are celebrating an outstanding crop of A level results. 78% of all grades were A*, A or B

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and over 49% of the grades awarded were A* or A grades.

Commenting on this achievement, Headmaster Simon Davies said: ‘Ahead of these results there was plenty of press coverage which suggested grades nationally would be depressed and schools would be disappointed. At Eastbourne, the very opposite is true: yet again, the headline figures are superb and, much more importantly, the great majority of individuals have met or exceeded their ambitious targets. This collective and individual success is all the more impressive when one considers that the 2014 leavers had, on paper, the lowest underlying academic ability of any year group in the last five years. This level of ‘value added’ can only be achieved when students and staff work effectively together.

Our boys and girls have worked extremely hard and received top class challenge and support from all those who have taught and mentored them. The outcome is an excellent set of grades and we are thrilled for them.

Eastbourne College resolutely remains a mildly selective school which continues to prove its ability to add significant value to the underlying ability of all its pupils, who, year after year, generate results that one would expect from young people at a much more selective school.’

Superb individual performances came from Stephen Burchett (5A*), Tammy Tam (4A*, 1A), Philip Winchester (4A*), Sophie Hatrick (3A*, 1A), Elysia Davies and Luke McWilton (3A*). Close behind them were Kelly Kuo (2A*, 2A, 1B), Joe Kinghorn (2A*, 2A) and Jessica Barnes, George Grave, Bradley Mackelden, Dammy Sokale and Oliver Wright (2A*, 1A). In addition, many congratulations to Will Dickens, Moiz Ghani and Chen Hsu who gained at least 2A*s.  

At AS level, the Lower Sixth performed extremely well, with 68% of grades awarded A or B, positioning them well for a successful final year at the College.

The Headmaster said: ‘We are absolutely delighted with how this year’s sixth formers have risen to the challenge of their AS and A level examinations and really pleased for all those who have done so very well. These results are a real tribute to the hard work of the pupils and teaching staff of Eastbourne College. We celebrate their outstanding individual and collective success.’

 

Pupils and staff at Eastbourne College are celebrating excellent GCSE results – the strongest outcome since the record was set in 2010.

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Over the last five years almost two thirds of all GCSE grades achieved by pupils at the College have been A* or A.

This year’s 118 Year 11 pupils achieved a 100% pass rate and all but one achieved five or more A*–C grades, with 29% of all grades at A* and 61% at either A* or A. Seventy-one of the year group (60%) notched up five or more A* and A grades.

Twelve pupils achieved at least 8A*s, with top students Toby Brooks and Tianyu Wang each gaining a clean sweep of 14 A*s. Close behind were Salwa Owasil (13A*), Robert Meikle and Lara Whitmore (12A*), Katie Butler-Manuel (11A*, 1A, 1B), Mia Finnamore (10A*, 1A) and Yolanda Morley (9A*, 3A).

Headmaster Simon Davies reflected:

‘We are delighted with what the girls and boys who took GCSEs in June have achieved by working hard and making the most of the first class teaching and support available to them at the College.  Of course it is uplifting to see those who have long lists of A*s after their names, but it is every bit as exciting to see others who have, for instance, 6As and 4Bs and know that this is a triumph for them given their underlying academic ability – the very definition of real and impressive value added! Headline figures are all very well, but what really counts is how each and every young person has done versus their own potential.

Our aim, as a mildly selective school, is to continue to see young people through to results that stack up against those of pupils from much more selective schools. Through a combination of their own efforts, high expectations, and plenty of support and challenge from those who teach and mentor them, very many of this year’s GCSE candidates have done themselves proud.

As well as doing all we can to ensure that our girls and boys perform well in public exams, we work hard to develop young people who will live fulfilled and successful adult lives. We achieve this by means of a very full co-curricular programme and a strong pastoral system that places an emphasis on developing young people’s values. Anyone who employs young people knows that exam grades are one thing; the ability to work hard, make teams work, show integrity, courtesy and kindness to all are another thing altogether.’

 

Other statistics:

Pass rate                                    100%

Percentage of students with at least five A*–C grades              99.2%

Percentage of students with at least five A grades or higher        60.2%

 

 

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