Mander Portman Woodward, Cambridge

Cambridgeshire

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  • Category: Senior / Sixth Form
  • Pupils: Co-Education
  • Type: Day & Boarding
  • Religious Affiliation: Non-Denominational
  • Roll: 123 (Boys) 74 (Girls)
  • Age Range: 15 - 19 years
  • Founded: 1987

General Information

MPW Cambridge offers one-year and two-year courses at A level and GCSE in a wide range of subjects. Students are taught individually or in small groups and are supported by Personal Tutors. The learning environment is friendly and informal, teachers are experienced and enthusiastic and the atmosphere is positive and conducive to success.

Facilities

Two large and well resourced buildings which are closely linked in Brookside and Panton Street. Each has bright, spacious teaching and study rooms. There is a reading room, an exam room, a student common room with canteen facilities, three science laboratories, two computer rooms and an art room. Several classrooms are fitted for screen-based learning and all subjects have access to audio-visual facilities and interactive whiteboards. Both buildings are in close proximity to the centre of Cambridge.

Entrance Requirements

Interview (plus 6 GCSEs at 'C' grade for 6th Form entry)

Scholarships

No; some bursaries are available.

Open Days

2019. Spring Open Day: Thurs. 28th February.

Should you wish to visit the college, please contact our Registrar, Miss Jane Heaton, on 01223 350158 or email cambridge@mpw.ac.uk.

Fees

2018/2019. Full time A-Level: £7,750 - £9,435 per term. Full time GCSE: £7,190 per term. For further details please contact the college

Reports

Ofsted Inspection 2016

School Contact Details

Headteacher: Dr Markus Bernhardt

Contact for enquiries: Miss Jane Heaton, Registrar

Mander Portman Woodward, Cambridge
3/4 Brookside
Cambridge
Cambridgeshire
CB2 1JE

[t]: 01223 350158
[f]: 01223 366429
[w]: www.mpw.ac.uk/locations/cambridge/

Location Description

The college is situated in spacious and attractive premises a few minutes' walk from the centre of Cambridge and close to the railway station

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School News

MPW Mander Prortman Woodward Cambridge independent college Cambridge

With all the free lectures and demonstrations given by world-class researchers throughout the year and especially at two annual events, the Cambridge Science Festival and the Festival of

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Ideas, our students have much to choose from already. Yet, we sometimes add to this with days organised particularly for our students at one of the university’s departments.

Thus, we have once again ventured out into the world of cutting edge research. This time it was our Psychology students, benefiting from having the Medical Research Council’s (MRC) Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit practically on our doorstep.

We are very grateful to the MRC, who proved once again only too happy to arrange a visit for our students when we contacted them. The premises in Chaucer Road are actually only about a 7 minute walk from our main site on Brookside.

On arrival, we were welcomed by Vicky Collins, who had very kindly coordinated this visit for us. Vicky took us straight to an impressive lecture theatre where Bob Carlyon, the Deputy Director, gave a brief introduction to the unit. Founded 75 years ago as the Applied Psychology Unit, it has taken a leading role in researching human cognition and its disorders, first through behavioural experiments but more recently also with the use of neuroimaging. These technologies enable researchers to identify the underlying brain mechanisms and structures behind cognitive processes such as perception, attention, memory and reasoning. The staff of the unit try to use their discoveries to help human wellbeing for all age groups and to develop treatments for disorders.

We were then given presentations from three researchers about their current projects at the unit. First, Dr David Johnson told us about the HARMONIC trial, a new transdiagnostic treatment for mood and anxiety disorders. Dr Camilla Nord next asked ‘Where is the brain in depression?’ and explained her research on the different brain areas associated with the different cognitive and emotional aspects of depression. The two talks dovetailed together and made very real the topics we have studied for A level under biopsychology and psychopathology. Besides treatments students had already learnt about, such as medication and CBT, we also gained a little glimpse into transcranial magnetic stimulation and transcranial electrical stimulation, which are able to target specific brain areas much more precisely than older interventions like electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). However, despite the bad image ECT has gained over the years, we learned that it is still one of the most reliably effective treatments for severe depression.

Lastly, Dr Sophie Borgeest talked to us about the relationship of lifestyle and ageing. Her research used a data-driven approach to analyse large sets of questionnaire responses from older people to identify clusters of behavioural factors. This interested students from the point of view of research methodology, a key part of the A level course, and they were able to see how sophisticated computer-based statistical analysis can be used to make sense of large volumes of data that would take individual psychologists aeons to go through. So far, the somewhat surprising finding of her research was that physical exercise is not as important for successful ageing as social and intellectual activities.

The speakers each challenged us with their research and were keen to get our input; we certainly challenged them with some of the questions we threw back as well. This was such a marvellous opportunity for A level students to engage in academic debate with scientists about live research topics and I was very pleased to see how much MPW students were completely engaged with this.

When the supply of questions started to run out, Vicky led us through the building to the MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) scanner, housed in the garden in a purpose-built lab. The radiographer, Dr Marius Mada, then showed us round the mock scanner. Although MRI scanning is completely harmless, sometimes patients or participants can find it scary, particularly children and older people. For one, going into the scanner can be claustrophobic. Also, it makes a lot of noise as the electro magnets fire up – somewhat like the Tardis about to travel through time and space. The mock scanner is a decommissioned scanner that is used in training and for patients to get acclimatised before being tested on the real thing. Marius asked for a volunteer and Adam stepped forward and lay down on the scanner bed. Marius then started a motor and Adam slowly disappeared headfirst into the scanner clutching only a teddy for comfort (provided by the scanner staff for anxious child patients). This was accompanied by a loud simulation of the intimidating sound it would normally make.

We had learnt about MRI as a method of studying the brain under biopsychology, so it was exciting to see a real (or at least mock) scanner in use, as well as to hear Marius’s explanation of the insights that can be gained this way. Patients in the scanner can be presented with tasks which test memory or perception on a screen above their head, while a 3D image of their brain is built by successive scans, highlighting areas of activity. Pinned on the wall were some glossy scans of the brains of study participants, together with some beautiful scans of plants which staff had produced just for their own interest and amusement.

Next we were off to another part of the unit, past long corridors of offices inhabited by neuroscientists, to see another type of brain scanner, the magnetoencephalography scanner (MEG), which has been used to research epilepsy and Alzheimer’s disease. Students were familiar from their A level course with electroencephalography (EEG), which involves a participant wearing a rubber cap covered with electronic sensors which pick up very small electrical waves across the surface of the brain. As with the scanner, the person can be given tasks to do while brain activity is recorded. The MEG is a more recent development of this technology which involves the participant sitting under a large hood which takes a succession of traces to build an image. Lordie volunteered this time and was first asked to remove all items of metal from his pockets, belt, watch etc. The scanner itself is situated inside a magnetically screened chamber, like a giant fridge (but not so cold) and after waving goodbye to us Lordie was sealed into it. He was in communication with the outside through microphone and speaker and we could all see him on a video link. Drs Olaf Hauk and Clare Cook, the two researchers who work with the MEG, then presented Lordie with two cognitive tasks on a computer screen, one visual and one auditory. As his brain was scanned, another computer built up an image of the sectors that were firing the most. Students could immediately relate these to the visual cortex at the back of the brain and the auditory cortex at the side, as they had studied on their A level course.

Fifty years ago, psychologists were able to test cognitive processes like memory, attention and perception, while medical researchers and neurologists were able to study functions of different brain areas through surgery and post-mortems. The use of MRI and similar techniques has brought together biology and psychology under the banner of neuroscience so that we are now able to map mental functions to brain structures. This means we can research what parts of the brain do, how they work together and crucially, what happens when some parts cease working properly through injury or disease.

We felt very privileged that the MRC staff had put some of their valuable time aside to tell and show us a little about their work. I especially like the way they didn’t just lecture our students, they asked them questions to see what they already knew or remembered about brain science. Of the nine students in the group, three are going on to read Psychology at university and I hope this insight into the cutting edge of modern research in neuroscience at one of the leading facilities in the world will have inspired and enthused them to learn more. After all, in a few years they could be back working there themselves!

And, of course, a huge thank you from our group to the MRC team!

 

MPW Mander Prortman Woodward Cambridge independent college Cambridge

One of the highlights of our year at MPW Cambridge is the Annual Celebration of Achievements Ceremony. This year’s venue was the glorious Great Hall

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of Homerton College, University of Cambridge, which was the perfect setting as it allowed the evening a traditional but relaxed atmosphere.

Also on hand to ensure everything ran smoothly were members of the Student Council, helping out in and around the venue. The evening provided an excellent opportunity for alumni, family members and staff, both past and present, to reacquaint, enjoy a glass of bubbly, alternatives were available, too, and celebrate.

Our Principal, Markus, opened the event and commencing the ceremony, our GCSE students were admirably represented by Guzalya, Tom and Michael who gave descriptive and at times hilarious accounts of life at MPW.

The thirteen main prizewinners came from many academic categories from A level as well as GCSE. However, the whole class of 2018 received certificates, celebrating their efforts and emphasising the fact that excellent academic grades are only one part of what our students achieve.

Dr Nick Marriot, former Principal of MPW Cambridge, presented the second edition of the Nick Marriot Award, Mr. Andrew Lee presented the Helen Lee Award for Outstanding Student of 2018 and Mr Alasdair Lewin presented the Andrew Lewin award for Best Lower Sixth Student.

Pannita Tregalnon, one of the main prizewinners, took the time to come back to Cambridge on the evening of a university exam, returning the next day to sit another. Pannita is currently a student at Imperial College London, where she is reading Aeronautical Engineering.

All in all a wonderful evening and thank you to everyone who joined us.

MPW Cambridge independent day and boarding school Cambridgeshire

As a non-selective college offering a wide range of subjects to students of differing abilities, MPW Cambridge is justifiably proud of the results and destinations

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that our students achieve.

A Level results: Building on the successes of previous years, our 2017 A Level results show another outstanding year for the college in which 36% of A level exams were at grades A*/A

The most commonly achieved (modal) outcome at A level was also once again A*/A

The pass rate across all subjects was once again 99%

We congratulate all the students and staff who contributed to another excellent year in 2017. Our 2017 A level leavers pursued a range of courses: some spent two years studying AS and then A2; an increasing number took on the challenge of the newer linear A levels over two years and many followed our one-year courses where all the AS and A2 units are compressed into just three terms. A significant number joined MPW at the end of Year 12; and a few students chose to follow our intensive retake courses. All of them benefited from the small class sizes, regular examination practice and Personal Tutor system that are some of the key features of MPW.

Drilling down into individual subjects, in History 43% of our leavers achieved an A* or A grade and an incredible 92% gained at least a B grade. Our Economics leavers managed 34% A* or A grades and 72% achieved at least a B grade. Our 2017 Mathematics leavers saw 53% secure an A* or A grade and an incredible 82% gained at least a B grade. 33% of our Sociology leavers managed A* or A and 67% of them scored at least a B grade.

GCSE results: Our GCSE results bucked the national trend. 73% of our entries were of A* to C, or equivalent. We are absolutely delighted with these results which show an increase from the previous year. We’re particularly proud of this year’s cohort who have taken the new, more challenging, reformed qualifications in their stride. Parents were also delighted and, in the words of one, ‘you delivered what you promised at interview and more.’

We honour our highest-achieving students from the prior year at a Certificates and Awards Evening each December. Many of our GCSE students return to MPW to begin A level courses. The overwhelming majority of our A level leavers proceed to university to pursue a variety of subjects including Architecture, Dentistry, Law, Medicine, Psychology and Veterinary Science.

As a non-selective college offering a wide range of subjects to students of differing abilities, MPW Cambridge is justifiably proud of the results and destinations

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that our students achieve.
Our A level and GCSE exam results are shown in this section. Building on the successes of previous years, our 2016 A Level results show another outstanding year for the college in which:

40% of A level exams were at grades A*/A (up from 39% last year)
18 leavers with at least three grades all at A*/A
The most commonly achieved (modal) outcome at A level was also once again A*/A
The pass rate across all subjects was once again 99%
We congratulate all the students and staff who contributed to another excellent year in 2016. Our 2016 A level leavers pursued a range of courses: some spent two years studying AS and then A2; many followed our one-year courses where all the AS and A2 units are compressed into just three terms; a significant number joined MPW at the end of Year 12; and a few students chose to follow our intensive retake courses. All of them benefited from the small class sizes, regular examination practice and Personal Tutor system that are some of the key features of MPW.

We honour our highest-achieving students from the prior year at a Certificates and Awards Evening each December. Many of our GCSE students return to MPW to begin A level courses. The overwhelming majority of our A level leavers proceed to university to pursue a variety of subjects including Architecture, Dentistry, Law, Medicine, Psychology and Veterinary Science.

Baffled by the A level reforms? Want to know how this could affect you or your child? Not sure what the next step might be?

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Then why not come along to our Special Open Day where we will be focussing on helping parents and students to understand the government reforms to education and providing expert advice and guidance regarding the next step. To book your place by calling us or go here to find out more:

http://www.mpw.ac.uk/locati…/cambridge/admissions/open-days/

Book a place by calling 01223 350158

MPW Cambridge has been running Easter Revision courses for over 25 years and from 28 March to 15 April we will once again be running

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our highly successful Easter Revision programme. With GCSE, IGCSE, AS legacy, AS reformed and A2 courses available across all three weeks there is bound to be a course that will help you in this all important run up to the exams. These courses build understanding and confidence by providing intensive revision of core topics, daily examination practice and help with study and revision skills.

Our tutors are highly-qualified graduates whose experience at MPW has trained them to be particularly adept at building students’ confidence quickly and efficiently. Many are GCSE and A level examiners and are therefore attuned to the requirements and approaches of the various examination boards. Easter students are taught in small groups (maximum of 9 students). Students must expect to be worked hard and tested regularly during their courses. Fully-supervised, full-board accommodation is available on selected weeks for students who are unable to commute daily. Please contact us for more information on accommodation options.

To find out more about Easter Revision check out the link below:

http://www.mpw.ac.uk/locations/cambridge/courses/easter-revision

Some 77% of pupils at MPW Cambridge obtained at least five A*-C grades including English and Maths.

Joel Rickard, assistant principal, said: “Given the demanding nature

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of GCSEs in one year and that we are a non-selective college we are proud of the achievements of our students and particularly pleased to see that our results have improved on last year with a 5% increase of students achieving A*-B grades.”

 

As a non-selective college offering a wide range of subjects to students of differing abilities, MPW Cambridge is justifiably proud of the results and destinations

view more

that our students achieve.

Building on the successes of previous years, the college achieved another first-class set of A level results in 2015:

  • 39% of A level exams were at grades A*/A
  • 70% of A level exams were at grades A*-B” (tenth successive year at 70% or higher)
  • A record 20 students achieved grades of AAA or higher

We congratulate all the students and staff who contributed to another excellent year in 2015. Our 2015 A level leavers pursued a range of courses: some spent two years studying AS and then A2; many followed our one-year courses where all the AS and A2 units are compressed into just three terms; a significant number joined MPW for A2 after an upper-sixth transfer; and a few students chose to follow our intensive retake courses. All of them benefited from the small class sizes, regular examination practice and Personal Tutor system that are some of the key features of MPW.

We honour our highest-achieving students from the prior year at a Certificates and Awards Evening each December. Many of our GCSE students return to MPW to begin A level courses. The overwhelming majority of our A level leavers proceed to university to pursue a variety of subjects including Architecture, Dentistry, Law, Medicine, Psychology and Veterinary Science.

 

 

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